Pilot and Feasibility Program

Pilot and Feasibility Program

The purpose of the Pilot and Feasibility Program (PFP) of the CDTR is to foster innovative and transformative research designed to eliminate disparities in diabetes. The PFP focuses on type II translational research in diabetes defined as translating interventions with demonstrated efficacy into real-world healthcare settings, communities, and populations at-risk for health disparities. The PFP provides initial research support over limited time periods to eligible investigators exploring the feasibility of ideas or concepts related to the CDTR mission.

The CDTR Pilot and Feasibility Program solicits applications annually from PIs interested in obtaining pilot funds for diabetes-related research. Proposals are reviewed internally by the center leadership, core directors, and additional outside reviewers using NIH scoring criteria, then prioritized according to their impact.

2018 Pilot Awardees:

Ryan Bailey, PhD, OTR/L

T32 Postdoctoral Research Scholar, Center for Healthy Weight & Wellness, Department of Psychiatry, WUSTL School of Medicine

Project Title: “Adapting the Diabetes Prevention Program for People with Stroke”

  • The purpose of this study is to examine the prevalence of diabetes risk factors among people with stroke in a nationally representative sample, while conducting focus groups with individuals with stroke to identify which components should be modified and how best to adopt the DPP for people with stroke.

Paulina Cruz Bravo, MD

Instructor in Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Lipid Research, WUSTL School of Medicine

Project Title: “Characterization of Hispanic/Latino Patients with Diabetes and their Barriers to Diabetes Care Delivery at a Community Health Center: A Feasibility and Pilot Study”

  • The overarching goal of this study is to characterize Hispanic and Latino patients with diabetes receiving care at  Affinia Healthcare, St. Louis, MO, and to identify patient related factors that predict failure to achieve six recommended ADA targets: glycemic control, blood pressure control, smoking cessation, physical activity, statin use, and aspirin use.

Ellen Kim, MD

Associate Professor, Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of Pediatrics, WUSTL School of Medicine

Project Title: “Group Intervention Program for High-risk Youth with Poorly-controlled Type 1 Diabetes”

  • The overarching goal of this pilot and feasibility project is to implement a clinic-based group education program targeting teens with poorly controlled diabetes, focusing on peer group interaction and education combined with social media support to increase engagement and promote behavioral change to improve glycemic control.

Melissa Lewis, PhD

Assistant Professor, Community and Family Medicine, University of Missouri Health School of Medicine

Project Title: “Creation of Indigenous Health Toolkit”

  • The goal of this study is to create a training protocol for medical providers based on best practices and community input to decrease provider bias and improve culturally appropriate care to improve healthcare outcomes for Indigenous People.

Ginger Nicol, MD

Assistant Professor of Psychiatry (Child), Department of Psychiatry, WUSTL School of Medicine

Project Title: “Adaptation of an Evidence-based Interactive Obesity Treatment Approach (iOTA) for Obesity Prevention in Serious Mental Illness: iOTA-SMI”

  • The overarching aim for this project is to pilot and iteratively adapt a scalable and sustainable Interactive Obesity Treatment Approach (iOTA) for adults with severe mental illness, planning for future effectiveness testing in a well-powered RCT, and eventual large scale dissemination and implementation.

Previous projects